Finishing the year #AgProud

2015 was a great year. A whirlwind year. A year of learning. A year of struggle. A year of trials, a year of triumph. I’m better today than I was one year ago. I can finish this year content, knowing I did what I could. And I’m looking forward to what WE can accomplish in the years to come.

“No matter what accomplishments you make, somebody helps you.”*

The above pictures are my tribe, my support structure, the people that keep me sane and keep me motivated. I’m proud to be part of Linn County, the city of Albany, Willamette Valley, state of Oregon, Pacific Northwest, West Coast, and the grand ol’ USA. I’m proud to be deeply rooted in the great world of agriculture. And as always, proud to be the daughter of a trucker.

I finish with this…

A New Year’s Prayer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anonymous

Dear Lord, please give me…
A few friends who understand me and remain my friends;
A work to do which has real value,
without which the world would be the poorer;
A mind unafraid to travel, even though the trail be not blazed;
An understanding heart;
A sense of humor;
Time for quiet, silent meditation;
A feeling of the presence of God;
The patience to wait for the coming of these things,
With the wisdom to recognize them when they come. Amen.

 

*From all I can find, this quote can be attributed to both Wilma Rudolph and Althea Gibson.

ENGAGE in OREGON’s future – won’t you?

I was asked to be a part of an exciting new organization: Engage Oregon. Its two main goals, in my opinion, are paramount to Oregon’s success in all areas.

GOALS:

  • Business is the solution, not the problem.
  • Government needs to be held accountable for spending, especially when it comes to dollars for education.

Our mission

To engage and activate Oregonians who care about growing and expanding job opportunities here in Oregon.

How can you disagree with that?

This past year I’ve been outspoken on behalf of Oregon agriculture, export, and trucking industries when it came to the mass confusion and incredible economical loss we encountered during the West Coast Port Crisis. Many farmers, truckers, mechanics, assembly line workers, equipment operators, office staff, etc… all saw extreme scenarios that put their jobs and their livelihoods at risk this past year.

I was asked to write a short column on my thoughts about this, and this was sent out to Engage Oregon’s supporters. I’d like to share here:

engage-oregon-logo

Dear Engage Oregon supporter,

Growing up in a farming family, I started driving tractor at age 12.  As I grew, so did my family’s businesses. Boshart Trucking, BOSSCO Trading, PressCo and SJB Farms, employ nearly 50 Oregonians, and provide Oregon-grown food, grass seed and forage to customers all over the world.  

Oregon is in a unique geographical position in both the nation and the world to capitalize on international trade, yet we are in trouble.

Agriculture is important to us as Oregonians and as Americans. From the words of our former governor: “Agriculture remains one of Oregon’s economic bright spots, creating about 1 in 10 Oregon jobs, with a $5.4 billion production value equal to roughly 15% of the state’s economy. There is tremendous diversity in what we grow, with more than 220 different commodities produced under some of the best growing conditions you’ll ever find. That array of crops, livestock, and fisheries strengthens our agricultural economy which strengthens all of Oregon.”

What does that mean in a nutshell? JOBS. The opportunity for Oregon agriculture and its effect on the economy is exciting – if we allow it to happen. Oregon agriculture has diversified into both domestic and global markets that are growing and have the capacity to grow more!

If we can’t get Oregon agricultural products to market, then the opportunity for economic growth has been lost. From the words of the Agriculture Transportation Coalition (AgTC): “There is nothing that we produce in this country in agriculture, that cannot be sourced somewhere else in the world. We can grow the best in the world, but if we can’t deliver affordably and dependably, the customer will go somewhere else… and may never come back.”

The current status of Oregon’s exports is discouraging. We no longer have container service at the Port of Portland. 99% of the Port of Portland’s container business left the state in February when Hanjin’s last vessel, the Copenhagen, pulled out of Portland after a 22-day moorage in February and Hapag Lloyd followed suit by not calling on the Port. This business has not been replaced. This has left Oregon’s exporters scrambling to find other means to get their product to the international market – primarily via Seattle and Tacoma.

For the sake of our economy, this has to change. Oregon’s agriculture – and those that rely on it for food, feed, shelter, and jobs – need every chance to be competitive. Oregon’s port working productively is one opportunity to accomplish this.

Thanks for staying in touch with Engage Oregon. Together we can turn the tide.

https://www.facebook.com/EngageOregon       https://twitter.com/engageoregon

Shelly Boshart Davis, Oregonian

Being engaged as an Oregonian – regardless of the side of the aisle you identify with – is something I think we should all aspire to.

If you’d like to join me in getting involved in this new organization, please do! Simply go to www.engageoregon.org, and sign up on the home page. Click through the website to learn more. Whatever you do, however you vote, this is something we can all proudly be a part of.

Happy Nut Day America!

To celebrate National Nut Day, here’s a few pictures from our new Hazelnut orchard. Did you know that 99% of the U.S. hazelnuts come from the Willamette Valley in Oregon?

Ashlynn and Sammie Jo "de-budding"

Ashlynn and Sammie Jo are “de-budding” our brand new trees 2 years ago.  “De-budding” trees is used to pull off the lower “buds” before they become limbs. Hazelnut “trees” are actually bushes. When we take off the lower “buds” or “limbs”, the tree uses it’s energy on the remaining higher limbs to grow as trees and therefore will produce more nuts for production.

Hazelnuts 7

You can see the difference a year makes! The orchard on the top half of the picture is one year older than the bottom half of the picture. The drip irrigation that you see (the black hose running along the treeline) waters the trees and reduces water waste.

Hazelnuts 6

Kyndall and Ashlynn are moving the drip irrigation lines closer to the trees. See on the right side of the picture – in front of Kyndall how the line has moved away from the trees?

George Dettwyler_Hazelnuts

This smiling future farmer is George Dettwyler. He’s helping his dad, Karl, pick up pots from the planted trees before they blow away. The Dettwyler’s of Blue Line Farms, are a local farm in the Silverton, Oregon area.

These next three photos are from my Farm Mom photo shoot – hence the fixed hair and cute kids! I’m showing 2 of my daughters – Kyndall and Sammie – and niece Claire, the growing hazelnuts.

Hazelnuts 9 Hazelnuts 10 Hazelnuts 11

Finally it was just announced – timely I may add – that Hershey’s is adding another candy to it’s Hershey Kiss line-up – with the hazelnut! See article here. YUMMY!

hersheys hazelnut

As you can see, we love hazelnuts!

Sweet Sammie Jo.

Sweet Sammie Jo.

Happy Friday everyone!

Edit: Apparently National Nut Day was October 22, yesterday. Oops! 

 

 

Senator Gelser, the friend.

The political climate these days is simply awful. It seems people are on one side or another – there are no moderates. I’m exaggerating a little. But I was pretty involved in the 2015 Oregon legislative session, and there wasn’t a lot of compromise.

Compromise jpeg

Seems we don’t use this much, hence the definition. A little sarcasm.

I spent a lot of time at the state capitol this last legislative session with organizations fighting for and against many issues. I also spent time advocating for business with the Governmental Affairs Committee through the Albany Area Chamber of Commerce. Through this time, I worked often with both my representation from my district: Representative Andy Olson and Senator Sara Gelser.

Disclaimer: I did not vote for Sara Gelser, nor do I agree with a lot of her voting record. But I do respect her as a person and her ability to communicate and for many items that she has passionately and tirelessly worked for. In reading through the below, I think you’ll like what she has to say.

The Albany Chamber asked if we (Boshart Trucking) would sponsor the Women In Business luncheon today, September 9th, with guest speaker Senator Sara Gelser. We said we would. The women from our company and farm, as well as a few female farming friends all attended; along with about 90 other “women in business” from the Albany area. What we heard was refreshing, and made me appreciate the work our legislators do even more. I’d like to share a few quotes, thoughts, and ideas from her talk today.

September 9, 2015, Women In Business, Guest Speaker: Dist. 8 Senator Sara Gelser. “Show Up, Work Hard, and Laugh Often.”

TEAMWORK

“It’s always a team effort – no matter what you’re doing.” Here she is talking about her father’s businesses and the fact that his employee’s tended to follow him wherever he went. She also likened this to getting things done in the legislature. When she is part of sponsoring a bill, or helping write one, she talked about going to the person or group that will oppose it the most to get input. More often than not, it becomes a team effort.

COMPASSION

“I’m interested in the people the people don’t talk about.” Here’s where my respect grows immensely for Senator Gelser. She diligently fights for special needs, for mental health, for abused youth, and for those that can’t speak for themselves. I appreciate people like her… while I tend to immediately think on the business side of things and how in the world do you pay for these kind of social services, this reminds me that compassion is needed sometimes more than I think. In most situations, it takes all kinds – both me and her. And this shows that.

LEADERSHIP

“Leadership Lesson: Whether a business, a soccer game or an election – how you lose is more important than how you win.” Aw ya, she’s speaking my language. I’m a coach, and this is SO very important and isn’t taught as much as I wish it were. There are more lessons in losing than in winning. In Senator Gelser’s case, she was speaking on when she lost her first election and the discussion she had with her kids was how to lose, not just how to win. What a lesson!

“Leadership Lesson: In leadership as in life, you can’t be who you’re not. If you’re going to lead, you have to be interested and have a vision with what you are passionate about. Lead from a place of knowledge.” Yes, such powerful words.

COMMON GROUND

“We’re all people – we’re not going to agree on everything. It’s most important to show up. You might just find out where you’re wrong.” Many times did Senator Gelser and I not agree on issues being debated in the legislature over the course of the last many months. But she showed up to meetings to talk about and explain what was happening at the state capitol. I continued to email her information on everything from increased fuel costs of our business (LCFS), to information about the ports and how that was hurting our export market, to how some of the anti-business legislation would hurt our farm and small business. And she returned every phone call and email. To me, that’s impressive. “The best way to make an angry constituent even angrier is to not return a phone call or email,” says Gelser.

“You have to be willing to talk to those you don’t agree with. The more you can focus on building relationships, the more you can find COMMON GROUND.” In today’s world, this is so hard and we simply don’t see it – from Washington DC to Oregon and everywhere in between.

politics_climate_1

So back to my title: Senator Gelser, the friend. We don’t see eye-to-eye on most issues. But after showing up today to listen to what she had to say, I feel we might just agree on more than I thought previously. We are both huge advocates of working hard and I truly see that in what she does. And, I did laugh often during her chat with us today. So, thank you Senator Gelser and I look forward to working with you in the future.

Tick tock, tick tock… Harvest is around the corner!

Baler_Word Swag

Where did the time go? I don’t know if you realize this, but it’s May 14th. And to us in Oregon and in the grass seed industry, that means harvest is right around the corner. So how did I get to middle of May and not realize it? Hmmmmm… let’s see…..

The WC Port Crisis began in November, and many think it is over and have moved on. For those of us truckers and exporters, we are very aware it is not over. (See my previous blogs on the subject if interested). The contract will be ratified on May 22nd we believe, but the congestion at Ports of Tacoma and Seattle as well as the remote container yard at Northwest Container Services is very real. Daily we still struggle with repercussions from the long-term slowdown. The cost to trucking companies, farmers, and exporters have been huge. Our “new normal” is right around the corner, and I wonder what that will look like for us Oregon farmers, trucking companies, and exporters.

Trucks Seattle 3

Trucks waiting in extreme congestion at Port of Seattle

The Oregon legislative session has been a nightmare. The anti-business, anti-rural, anti-agriculture consistent themes have been one that demands the average farmer, businessperson and Oregonian to speak out like never before. Read a friend’s perspective on this here at www.oregongreenblog.com. I personally have been to the state capitol 3 times to testify against the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, diesel emission regulations, and minimum wage public hearings. Here is another friend’s perspective on the Minimum Wage bills here at www.nuttygrass.com. Many, many more bills that are important to us farmers and small businesses: legislated pesticide usage, mandatory PTO, mandatory flexible scheduling, BOLI “cease and desist” bills, and more. Countless letters, phone calls, and emails have been sent speaking out about these and making sure my local representation knows my thoughts on these matters. If you are reading this outside Oregon and are shocked that we’re dealing with all of this at one time, I agree – it’s almost unbelievable. Lastly, a local measure, Measure 2-89 in Benton County wants to ban all usage of GMO in the county. If this passes, a terrible precedent will be set for remaining counties.

NoOn2-89logo@2x

I coached a local club volleyball team through BOSS Volleyball. Yes, I coach volleyball. And love it! The courts are actually laid in one of our straw barns. As soon as we get the straw out of this particular barn, the club comes in and lays “sport court”. 6 different teams practiced 2x/week every week. Throw in 1-2 tournaments on the weekends every month, and well suffice to say I was quite busy. My daughter Kyndall was on my team, and it was a great opportunity to spend extra time with her and watch her and her friends grow as athletes. If you want my opinion on athletics and coaching – it’s a dying breed of coaches that feel we are teaching kids how to become better adults through sports. So many people have lost site of this – parents and coaches alike, and competition sometimes gets in the way. I saw this at every tournament. If you can ever find the time to volunteer as a local coach, I urge you to do so. It is one way to help our kids become contributing members of society, instilling teamwork, attitude and hard work into their core. Pretty soon, it becomes natural to use this hard work and positive attitude into every avenue of their life. A win for all!

At the BOSS Barn

At the BOSS Barn

Community Outreach – near and dear to my family’s heart. We’re part of Adopt A Farmer program through the AgriBusiness Council. We bring 180 6th-graders from Memorial Middle School in Albany, Oregon, to our farm. We had 5 stations to show them different aspects of our farm and businesses: 1) My brother, Farmer Amos, showed the kids about straw storage and even let them run the hay squeeze! 2) A local farmer, Farmer Ryan Glaser of Mid-Valley Farms, showed the kids our hazelnut orchards and taught them all about Oregon’s Hazelnuts. 3) My dad, Farmer Stan, showed the kids all of our equipment – from windrowers and combines to tractors, spray buggies and balers. But, I think Coach the Dog stole the show on this station! 4) Our Operations Manager, Farmer Eric, took the kids through the mechanic shop – starting with the truck scales where they weighed themselves as a group all at once, and finished talking about tires – some of them twice the height of the kids! – with the help of Terry, our local Les Schwab guy! 5) The final station was mine – and I showed the kids how we press the bales, containerize them and ship them overseas to customers. I explained the opportunities and challenges of working in an international marketplace, but they were more concerned about the money from around the world laid out on the table! In case you didn’t know, kids LOVE money. 🙂

Farmer Amos talking about straw bales

Farmer Amos talking about straw bales

Farmer Eric weighing kids on the truck scale

Farmer Eric weighing kids on the truck scale

Farmer Ryan talking about Oregon Hazelnuts

Farmer Ryan talking about Oregon Hazelnuts

In addition to Adopt A Farmer, we are involved with the local Albany Chamber of Commerce, bringing out their Youth Leadership and Trades Academy programs for tours on our farm. Lastly, we are involved with the Oregon Women for Agriculture and work on many projects including this great advertisement rolling down our highways and biways! Our Boshart Trucking trucks proudly haul this trailer all over Oregon – the response to it has been awesome! We love promoting “almost everything starts on a farm or ranch!”

OWA wrap_Word Swag

Then there was this little thing called Farm Mom. I laugh at that, because truly it was a huge deal! I found out on April 16th that I was the NW division winner of America’s Farmers Farm Mom of the Year! I flew to St. Louis April 22-24, at that time a national online vote was started. I found out last Thursday, May 7th, that I had the most votes and became the National Farm Mom of the Year. I know it’s a funny title, but I honestly couldn’t have picked a better one – Farm Mom, my favorite two titles for my life. I wrote a little about this in my last blog: The Most Important Crop I Grow… My Children. Along the way, I met 4 incredibly impressive women: Amy Kelsay, a dairy farmer from Indiana; Megan Seibel, a wine-grape grower and cattle farmer from Virginia; Shelley Heinrich, a cotton farmer from Texas; and Sara Ross, a corn farmer and member of Common Ground. Sara also blogs – you should check out here: Sara’s House – farm to table to you. Meeting these women in person, along with past Farm Mom’s through phone and email, I’m very grateful to be part of one incredible group.

Farm Mom_Word Swag

So, that’s where my last 6 months went! And now we’re gearing up for 2015 harvest – my favorite time of year! Gearing up for it takes a coordinated effort, and we’re in the thick of it now! Ready or not, here we go! Bring it on!

Why this affects you.

The current port crisis isn’t just an Agriculture issue – this is an Oregon issue, a Pacific Northwest issue, an American issue.

Ag picture

We are a couple decades removed from the general public knowing their local farmer, understanding the farmer’s plight, respecting the neighboring farm, and supporting the farm families. We – the general public – have simply become urbanized, and have lost touch with what happens outside the city borders – people have lost touch with what goes on in rural America, and in doing so, what it takes to provide the food on their table, the textiles that make the clothes they wear and the seed that they use to plant their lawns and gardens. Critics of modern production agriculture are pushing the negative idea that we are all “corporate farms”, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports the vast majority of farms and ranches in the United States are family owned and operated – in fact, 93 percent of the 2.1 million farms in the United States are family owned (http://findourcommonground.com/food-facts/corporate-farms/). There are blogs going around that the wheat we eat is poison. Since when? From the words of my farmer friend Brenda: “I want to tell you a short story about how we check our wheat before harvest to see if it’s ready, and also during harvest to make sure that the moisture is right.  We grab a handful (with our bare hands) and we toss kernels into our mouths and we eat it.  This practice has been done for generations.  My grandpa ate wheat straight from the field, straight from the combine, my dad has, and I do as well.  You would think that if anyone is going to come away from this whole conventional wheat experience with a toxic disease it would be us…but we don’t.  We are all healthy as horses, because what we are growing is safe and healthy.  Now I know as much as anyone that this isn’t scientific, but it does show how much we trust what we are doing out here in the fields.” (For more information on this topic, see: http://nuttygrass.com/ or http://prairiecalifornian.com/truth-toxic-wheat/)

Agriculture is important to us as Oregonians and as Americans. From the words of our Governor Kitzhaber: “Agriculture remains one of Oregon’s economic bright spots, creating about 1 in 10 Oregon jobs, with a $5.4 billion production value equal to roughly 15 percent of the state’s economy. There is tremendous diversity in what we grow, with more than 220 different commodities produced under some of the best growing conditions you’ll ever find. That array of crops, livestock, and fisheries strengthens our agricultural economy, which strengthens all of Oregon. But our agriculture sector is more than numbers, it’s also about what makes this place so special – our open spaces, vistas, greenery, and sustainable natural resources. Those Oregonians who have chosen to raise our food and fiber deserve our gratitude and support, and I ask that all Oregonians join me in thanking them for their incredible contribution to our state.” Well, Governor, you’re welcome.

Teaching the girls how to de-bud hazelnut trees

Teaching the girls how to de-bud hazelnut trees

What does that mean in a nutshell? JOBS. The opportunity for Oregon’s Agriculture and it’s affect on the economy is exciting – if we can allow it to happen. Oregon agriculture has diversified into markets that are growing very fast… These markets offer the potential to revitalize an industry that is slowly being recognized as having an increasing role in Oregon economic future.* Agriculture… having an increasing role in Oregon’s economic future! More jobs, more revenue!

Okay, so we – Agriculture – we’re kind of a big deal. When we really look at it – Oregon’s Agriculture is NECESSARY for the continued strength of the state.

OR Ag important exports

Excerpt from Oregon Department of Agriculture presentation – click on to be linked to blog “Crisis on West Coast Ports”

But if we can’t get it to market, then what good is any of it?

We are on day 13 of a West Coast Port crisis. The hard-working (when they’re working) members of the ILWU at the West Coast Ports are stuck in a negotiation-tactic filled fight with the PMA (Pacific Maritime Association). Until this is resolved and a contract is finally filed, we are at the mercy of the Big Dogs. Our farm is fighting, our company is fighting, our straw-export industry is fighting, the Christmas Tree industry is fighting, the Washington Apple industry is fighting – we’re ALL fighting to stay alive, to continue business, to continue our ever-so-important relationships with our overseas buyers. Some of us might not survive this, and that is sickening.

Governor Kitzhaber, President Obama, members of Congress – you KNOW how important Agriculture is to this state, this country. Our history is filled with the stories of the American Farmer. At some point along the way, the American Farmer became two antithetical people – the adversary (see above in regards to “corporate farms” and “poisoning food”) but also the romanticized and commercialized icon of America.

God made a farmer_tractor

Think 2013 Dodge Ram’s Super Bowl commercial using Paul Harvey’s “So God made a Farmer.” If you haven’t watched the commercials, or read the entire speech – you should (See below for link). It’s amazing, and makes me tear up every time I read it and watch it – because it’s true. Farmers are special people choosing a lifestyle that’s not easy, bringing their family with them into the field, working long hours – all to get their product to market in order to survive another year.

Their product to market… Again, market. I’ve quoted this before, and I’ll quote it again:

“There is nothing that we produce in this country in agriculture, that cannot be sourced somewhere else in the world. We can grow the best in the world, but if we can’t deliver affordably and dependably, the customer will go somewhere else… and may never come back”.

This state, this country, will have a different landscape if we 1- cannot get our product to market and 2- farmers are regarded as anything but supporters of America and caretakers of the land.

“Opportunities and challenges” is perhaps a cliché, yet it is a phrase that certainly fits Oregon agriculture today. Agriculture holds great potential to contribute to the solution, as long as the entrepreneurs and policy makers who recognize agriculture’s role as an economic engine in the past continue to acknowledge its even greater potential for the future.*

We need the support of our neighbors, our state, and our government to continue to provide food, jobs and revenue for the good of us all.

Watch So God Made a Farmer Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMpZ0TGjbWE

*http://ruralstudies.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/pub/pdf/OregonAgEconomyAnUpdate.pdf

From the White House

“We alerted them that agriculture and forest products, America’s largest and most important export, are in serious peril.”

I’m shocked that this information isn’t on the news – and other than those I’ve talked to about – or maybe some that have read my blog or Facebook posts – the general public has no idea what’s going on. And according to this update, the National Economic Council and the Department of Commerce didn’t know either. I’ve pasted the update from our Executive Director, Peter Friedmann, after he met with some White House leadership. (See end of blog)

Why is this? I’m trying to figure out why the general public doesn’t know or understand. Do I dare believe that the ILWU is so powerful that the media doesn’t dare tick them off? If you want to be shocked about something, read this: http://www.pmanet.org/the-ilwu-workforce. (I’ll be blogging on this subject in the future). In a nutshell: Full-time workers earn an average of $147,000 annually in wages, along with a non-wage benefits package costing more than $82,000 per active worker per year. You better believe they don’t want this information out when they are crying about fair compensation and being blue collar middle-class families. They also don’t want it to get out that they are trying to negotiate to NOT pay the taxes on their Cadillac health care plans. And of course they don’t want automation – to keep our ports competitive – because they want to keep these high paying jobs.

I feel like I’m beginning to sound like a doomsday-er. I truly don’t intend to! Only two things can happen at this point: the PMA can cave into the demands of the ILWU so that they get back to work and stop their negotiating tactics of port slow downs – this option makes it harder to compete on an international level… Or the situation hurts the economy so badly that our US Congress and/or President Obama needs to step in. It’s a lose-lose situation.

I realize that I need to write some background to the labor/contract dispute. I will try to do that soon. Hope this is enough to start getting the general public some knowledge into their economic limbo. I believe that the newspapers and TV will start covering this by the end of the week if this does not begin to improve. Until then, this is all I’ve got to help – one voice.

AgTC: White House Meeting Update

November 12, 2014

The AgTC and other industry groups met with White House leadership of the Domestic Policy Council, National Economic Council, and Department of Commerce to discuss the crippling port disruption on the West Coast. We alerted them that agriculture and forest products, America’s largest and most important export, are in serious peril.

There were a lot of aspects that the White House was completely unaware of– they didn’t know how much cargo is being left at the docks or is not able to be moved at all. We were very concerned at how little the White House knew about the situation at the West Coast ports and the impact on the nation’s economy. We made sure that they know now.

The White House said they were monitoring the situation, and we strongly emphasized that monitoring is insufficient. We urged the Administration to take firm action such as bringing in a federal mediator, as was the case in previous instances of labor-management disputes. We told them that we are weighing in with our Congressional delegations and that they will be hearing from Members of Congress.

In the meantime, we will continue to reach out to the press, because we believe the White House will respond immediately to the glare that is cast upon the White House by the press inquiries. We need to stimulate more of those press inquiries, and that is what we will continue to do.

Hi my name’s Shelly, and I’m an advocate.

I really wish that my second blog post could have dealt with sunshine and lollipops – maybe some cute kid pictures, some “Hello from the farm Friday” pictures.

Unfortunately, I’m diving head-on into something a little bigger than lollipops…  Oregon’s and America’s economy. Yikes, I know.

Port of Seattle

This is the line of trucks on Wednesday trying to get into the Port of Seattle. Port of Tacoma looks like this too… We are on DAY 5 of not being able to turn in containers into Port of Tacoma. To make a terribly complicated and long story short… we are one step away from the West Coast Ports – including Los Angeles and Long Beach – being completely shut down. 65% of America’s imports come through the Ports of LA and LB. The threat to America’s economy is estimated at $2 BILLION each DAY there is a shut down. Immediate action is necessary at the federal government level. Letters from the largest organizations and businesses in the country are urging President Obama to do something!

So, what can I do? It seems like nothing. But I’m constantly reminded that one person CAN do something – and so I am. I’m spending way too much time of my working day writing my state congress men and women, and our newly re-elected Governor Kitzhaber. I’ve written to Oregon’s representation in the US Congress. I’ve contacted Oregon Trucking Association. Our export groups are writing letters and contacting Congress. It takes hours to do this – hours I need to spend working, to minimizing costs to our business, to help with dispatching trucks and making decisions on what to do in the midst of this crisis, all to try and keep our customer’s schedules on time as much as possible. It currently is impossible to do so – there are millions of dollars of product being imported and exported that are currently sitting on docks on all the West Coast Ports, simply not moving.

My guess is that most of the public doesn’t care – and not in a negative sense! They just don’t know! But, every time something happens in the world of transportation, it will affect the consumer – typically in either higher costs, or product not getting to market. Think of it in terms of your favorite local coffee shop… those coffee beans are sitting in containers in port, or maybe not unloaded off the ship in Seattle. And all of a sudden the costs of those containers sitting at port adds up, and someone has to pay for it! Guess who ends up paying? That’s right – you and I.

And I care deeply for all of the reasons above, but what I most care about is Oregon and it’s wonderful AGRICULTURE. And guess what happens if this problem doesn’t eventually get fixed and fixed quickly… we lose our international customers. Consider the wise statement upon which the Agriculture Transportation Coalition was organized:

“There is nothing that we produce in this country in agriculture, that cannot be sourced somewhere else in the world. We can grow the best in the world, but if we can’t deliver affordably and dependably, the customer will go somewhere else… and may never come back”.

What happens if our customers around the world choose their Agricultural products elsewhere? This home that we call Oregon begins looking a lot different. We as a state can produce the finest agricultural products available – but if we can’t get those products to market, then we all suffer, including our next generation. Here’s my next generation – and this way I can tone this blog down with cute kids picture!

My girls

Here’s hoping that tomorrow is truly a new day for us!

The first

I’ve always been passionate. Some call it stubborn, maybe strong-willed… But, I’m going to stick with passionate. I’m also a tad non-confrontational. And have always been scared to stand up too tall for any cause – just in case I don’t know all the facts, or can’t back up my position – but most of all, I hate offending people. These days I’m learning a balance – being passionate, while being respectful of other’s positions. Maybe listening a little more. And, I’m also noticing… I’m talking a little more, too.

So I started a blog. Daughter of a Trucker. It doesn’t begin to explain the many hats I wear these days, but it’s one of my favorites – always has been. My dad farmed from when he was a kid, and started a trucking business with his brother Gene when I was 3 years old. So, Agriculture – and all aspects of it – was my life since I was young. I love it, and it’s still my life today. I will pass on this love to my daughters – 3 of them!

I know I’ll have lots to write about, to talk about: Oregon’s agriculture, trucking issues, family business, FAMILY, daughters, marriage, farming, international business, volunteerism, straw baling, my AMAZING husband, travels, the importance of community, coaching volleyball, my friend Jesus, hard-work, politics, being a mom!!, and maybe a little bit about coffee. 😉

But, for now, I’ll end with: Hi, my name’s Shelly, and I’m a daughter of a trucker. Dad and I