Why this affects you.

The current port crisis isn’t just an Agriculture issue – this is an Oregon issue, a Pacific Northwest issue, an American issue.

Ag picture

We are a couple decades removed from the general public knowing their local farmer, understanding the farmer’s plight, respecting the neighboring farm, and supporting the farm families. We – the general public – have simply become urbanized, and have lost touch with what happens outside the city borders – people have lost touch with what goes on in rural America, and in doing so, what it takes to provide the food on their table, the textiles that make the clothes they wear and the seed that they use to plant their lawns and gardens. Critics of modern production agriculture are pushing the negative idea that we are all “corporate farms”, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports the vast majority of farms and ranches in the United States are family owned and operated – in fact, 93 percent of the 2.1 million farms in the United States are family owned (http://findourcommonground.com/food-facts/corporate-farms/). There are blogs going around that the wheat we eat is poison. Since when? From the words of my farmer friend Brenda: “I want to tell you a short story about how we check our wheat before harvest to see if it’s ready, and also during harvest to make sure that the moisture is right.  We grab a handful (with our bare hands) and we toss kernels into our mouths and we eat it.  This practice has been done for generations.  My grandpa ate wheat straight from the field, straight from the combine, my dad has, and I do as well.  You would think that if anyone is going to come away from this whole conventional wheat experience with a toxic disease it would be us…but we don’t.  We are all healthy as horses, because what we are growing is safe and healthy.  Now I know as much as anyone that this isn’t scientific, but it does show how much we trust what we are doing out here in the fields.” (For more information on this topic, see: http://nuttygrass.com/ or http://prairiecalifornian.com/truth-toxic-wheat/)

Agriculture is important to us as Oregonians and as Americans. From the words of our Governor Kitzhaber: “Agriculture remains one of Oregon’s economic bright spots, creating about 1 in 10 Oregon jobs, with a $5.4 billion production value equal to roughly 15 percent of the state’s economy. There is tremendous diversity in what we grow, with more than 220 different commodities produced under some of the best growing conditions you’ll ever find. That array of crops, livestock, and fisheries strengthens our agricultural economy, which strengthens all of Oregon. But our agriculture sector is more than numbers, it’s also about what makes this place so special – our open spaces, vistas, greenery, and sustainable natural resources. Those Oregonians who have chosen to raise our food and fiber deserve our gratitude and support, and I ask that all Oregonians join me in thanking them for their incredible contribution to our state.” Well, Governor, you’re welcome.

Teaching the girls how to de-bud hazelnut trees

Teaching the girls how to de-bud hazelnut trees

What does that mean in a nutshell? JOBS. The opportunity for Oregon’s Agriculture and it’s affect on the economy is exciting – if we can allow it to happen. Oregon agriculture has diversified into markets that are growing very fast… These markets offer the potential to revitalize an industry that is slowly being recognized as having an increasing role in Oregon economic future.* Agriculture… having an increasing role in Oregon’s economic future! More jobs, more revenue!

Okay, so we – Agriculture – we’re kind of a big deal. When we really look at it – Oregon’s Agriculture is NECESSARY for the continued strength of the state.

OR Ag important exports

Excerpt from Oregon Department of Agriculture presentation – click on to be linked to blog “Crisis on West Coast Ports”

But if we can’t get it to market, then what good is any of it?

We are on day 13 of a West Coast Port crisis. The hard-working (when they’re working) members of the ILWU at the West Coast Ports are stuck in a negotiation-tactic filled fight with the PMA (Pacific Maritime Association). Until this is resolved and a contract is finally filed, we are at the mercy of the Big Dogs. Our farm is fighting, our company is fighting, our straw-export industry is fighting, the Christmas Tree industry is fighting, the Washington Apple industry is fighting – we’re ALL fighting to stay alive, to continue business, to continue our ever-so-important relationships with our overseas buyers. Some of us might not survive this, and that is sickening.

Governor Kitzhaber, President Obama, members of Congress – you KNOW how important Agriculture is to this state, this country. Our history is filled with the stories of the American Farmer. At some point along the way, the American Farmer became two antithetical people – the adversary (see above in regards to “corporate farms” and “poisoning food”) but also the romanticized and commercialized icon of America.

God made a farmer_tractor

Think 2013 Dodge Ram’s Super Bowl commercial using Paul Harvey’s “So God made a Farmer.” If you haven’t watched the commercials, or read the entire speech – you should (See below for link). It’s amazing, and makes me tear up every time I read it and watch it – because it’s true. Farmers are special people choosing a lifestyle that’s not easy, bringing their family with them into the field, working long hours – all to get their product to market in order to survive another year.

Their product to market… Again, market. I’ve quoted this before, and I’ll quote it again:

“There is nothing that we produce in this country in agriculture, that cannot be sourced somewhere else in the world. We can grow the best in the world, but if we can’t deliver affordably and dependably, the customer will go somewhere else… and may never come back”.

This state, this country, will have a different landscape if we 1- cannot get our product to market and 2- farmers are regarded as anything but supporters of America and caretakers of the land.

“Opportunities and challenges” is perhaps a cliché, yet it is a phrase that certainly fits Oregon agriculture today. Agriculture holds great potential to contribute to the solution, as long as the entrepreneurs and policy makers who recognize agriculture’s role as an economic engine in the past continue to acknowledge its even greater potential for the future.*

We need the support of our neighbors, our state, and our government to continue to provide food, jobs and revenue for the good of us all.

Watch So God Made a Farmer Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMpZ0TGjbWE

*http://ruralstudies.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/pub/pdf/OregonAgEconomyAnUpdate.pdf

One thought on “Why this affects you.

  1. Pingback: Unfortunately: “I told you so.” | daughter of a trucker

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