Bad Bill Crushed: HB2859, a Win for Farmers, Ranchers and Foresters 

Today, over 100 farmers, ranchers and foresters showed up at the Oregon State Capitol for a public hearing for House Bill 2859. Irony would have it that we just finished the wettest month in record in February and then today, March 1st, was beautiful and sunny. Guaranteed had it been rainy, we would have had twice that many at the hearing.

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And in overflow outside the hearing room because it was packed!


Brenda Frketich did a great write up about the bill earlier this week if you want to learn more about it: read it here. Or you could find it here on OLIS. With the sharing by many people on Social Media and with Oregon Farm Bureau doing a great job gathering grassroots, the natural resource community showed up!

Why? Honestly it’s simple: our way of life and livelihood was being threatened.

After over 30 farmers, foresters and ranchers testified to the Revenue Committee what this bill would do to their operation, Chair Barnhart literally said, “In other words, you win.” Because of the overwhelmingly response from the natural resource community, the committee understood the ramifications. It was the first time I had ever heard a round of applause in a committee hearing! It was fantastic!

Farmers, ranchers and foresters: great job, way to show up and make your voice and your story heard!

For a summary, see some Tweets from the day.


And for pictures of some that testified and attended, see here:


There’s a lot more to fight this legislative session unfortunately, but today I’m happy for the win.

 

To see submitted testimony on OLIS, see here

 

Transportation and Oregon – a love/hate relationship – Part 1

Transportation isn’t sexy. And when it works, no one talks about it. We fly under the radar for the most part. Now, it seems that every time you turn around, someone is talking about transportation. It could be congestion in Portland, the Port of Portland, container exports, trucks on the road, CARB (California Air Resource Board), LCFS (Low Carbon Fuel Standard), or the upcoming transportation package the Oregon Legislature is going to tackle in the 2017 Legislative Session.

If you are reading this from a state that has transportation figured out – I envy you! Us Oregonians seem to be on the struggle bus these days. (Transportation pun intended!)

I spoke at the Oregon Seed League convention last month and updated everyone on current issues regarding exports, transportation and Port of Portland. In fact, there were two agenda items dealing with transportation and port issues! I told the audience: “I’ll bet you’re looking forward to the day we stop talking about transportation.” It got a few laughs, but I’ll take it. I’m really not that funny.

Unfortunately, this isn’t a laughing matter. Also unfortunate is the amount of misinformation out there when it comes to transportation, trucking, and ports. I’d like to tackle a few of those here.

  1. CONTAINER TRUCKS AREN’T CAUSING CONGESTION IN PORTLAND.

What? I know I know, you’ve been told it’s container trucks, and it seems like it would make sense because of the Port of Portland not having container service at Terminal 6 any longer. But it’s not. Did you know: Only 200 out of 120,000 vehicles are related to containers moving to ports other than the Port of Portland. Trucks aren’t going anywhere they haven’t gone before.

portland-congestion-facts

But but but… congestion! Yes, Portland is awful. And it doesn’t appear to be getting any better. But it’s not trucks. It’s cars. Next time you’re in traffic, take a look around. You notice the trucks because they’re big rigs. But, compare the number of trucks to the vast amount of cars. And how many of those cars are single passenger?

When is Portland the worst? Rush hour. When are container trucks driving to or through Portland? I can guarantee you, it’s not rush hour. If we get caught in rush hour traffic, it’s because something has gone wrong at a terminal somewhere. We leave our plant early enough to miss rush hour in Portland, and we are typically back before rush hour in the afternoon. Does this always work every day? No, but, for the most part, we’re not stuck in rush hour traffic.

What’s the real problem? Traffic congestion increased recently along the Portland metro-area roadways. Vehicle volumes have increased 6.3% over volumes from last year. This increase is nearly twice the national average. The rise in vehicle volumes means that roads are running at or near capacity during the peak hours, commute times are growing longer, and driver frustration is building. Growth on the system is due to new users. The number of out-of-state drivers’ licenses increased to approximately 85,000 in 2015. In addition, a drop in unemployment means more people heading to and from work. Lower gas prices than one year ago also makes it less expensive to travel. (Information from Oregon Department of Transportation)

For more information on what ODOT is doing to help the traffic and congestion problems crippling Portland, click on info-graphs above.

2. IS THERE INCREASED TRUCK TRAFFIC ON I-5 SINCE PORTLAND LOST CONTAINER SERVICE?

trucks-on-road

Short answer, yes, there is increased traffic on the roads. And we are some of those trucks on the road. We also utilize Northwest Container Service (NWCS, a remote container yard) located in Portland. NWCS then rails containers north to the ports of Tacoma and Seattle. We can drop off and pick up containers at NWCS, but they cannot handle all of our volume, and there are increased risks to only using NWCS (namely less ability to have on-time delivery). So, as part of our business strategy to keep our shipments on time and to best service our customers, we deliver to a combination of NWCS, and ports of Tacoma and Seattle. If and when Portland brings back container service, we will use Terminal 6 at Port of Portland. Diversification is a key strategy in being successful in the strange world of international container shipping.

In summary, yes there are more trucks on the road because Terminal 6 at Port of Portland lost container service… but don’t blame the Portland traffic and congestion problems on trucks. These are 2 separate problems that really don’t have anything to do with one another.

I love and appreciate trucks and the truck drivers that deliver 75% of our goods to us. In fact, I think it’s time to thank a trucker. Today and every day. It’s not an easy job, and those that safely do their job day in and day out, you are appreciated. thank-a-trucker-1

If you’d like to learn more about the Port of Portland and why Terminal 6 is different than the rest of the terminals on the West Coast, you can read more here

There’s so much more to talk about in regards to transportation in Oregon! I know, so exciting… but for those of you who are interested, stay tuned for Part 2!

Hiking Boots and Cowboy Boots – Owyhee Canyon hearing

Something was different Monday morning at the Oregon State Capitol. Cowboy boots and hiking boots outnumbered heels and dress shoes. I’ve always thought: “I may wear cowboy boots and you may wear heels, but we’re both moms” when I talk about wanting similar things in life – we want to be good moms. I noticed the same idea here – whether you were wearing hiking boots or cowboy boots, we all agreed on one thing: the Owyhee Canyonlands are beautiful.

Spoiler alert, the entire theme to this blog post is this: the Owyhee Canyonlands are beautiful because of the residents and the ranchers and the farmers who live there. Why change this? Why disrupt the ecosystem that is working? Why?

Owyhee 2

Existing layers of protection

If you’re answer is “it needs to be protected”, then please look at this slide from Representative Cliff Bentz showing existing layers of “protection”.

Some points to take away from our state legislators that oppose the monument designation:

“If we’re going to protect this land, let’s do this right.” – Representative Cliff Bentz

“This proposal for an executive order is a great public relations ploy, it is guaranteed to polarize Oregonians, it pits urban against rural, it’s a cheap environmental vote. Our challenge today as legislators for the state is to figure out how rural communities can become more sustainable, and if you think creating destinations by making a circle on a map will help, I would ask you to look at all the timber-dependent communities that were told that tourism and recreation would completely replace the forest products and manufacturing jobs that used to be prevalent. It never happened.” – Senator Ted Ferrioli

“What are we protecting that is not protected and why do we want it protected? And protect it from what? I’m not seeing a spot on the map that is either not protected or is not governed by an agency with protections? What are we protecting against?” – Representative Sherrie Sprenger

Many traveled hundreds of miles from Malheur County to speak. Some points to note:

“We have an online petition on our website: Our Land Our Voice, urging Governor Brown and Senators Wyden and Merkley to urge the White House to not designate this area as a national monument.” – Jordan Valley Rancher Elias Eiguren

“This is bad for Oregon, this is bad for the land, this is bad for the people who live there.” – Jordan Valley Rancher Elias Eiguren

“What’s wrong with the status quo? Let’s not fix what’s not broken.” – Steve Boren, Steve Boren Rafting

“Don’t mess with an economy that works. Don’t mess with an ecosystem that works.” – Steve Boren, Steve Boren Rafting

“Maybe if you’re a footwear company in Portland or an activist in Bend, this sounds quite trivial. Maybe you shrug it off, but for an entire region of this state, it has been all too real and all too painful… If a monument is declared in Malheur County, I am concerned about public safety. I am concerned about the people from outside the area who will come to our county with their own agendas. We will not be successful in dealing with these folks. I fear they will not be reasonable. What we need now are not actions that divide or pit one group against another… What we need now is healing. That’s why I ask you, our state elected officials, to stand with us in sending a clear message to President Obama that the time and place for the nation’s next national monument is not Malheur County and certainly not now. As a sheriff from Malheur County, my job is to restore and maintain peace. That is what we need now, more than ever, is peace.” – Malheur County Sheriff Brian Wolfe

“You may have heard this designation is not about grazing rights and that no existing grazing rights will be affected. Even if it’s not the legal effect to start, it has been the practical effect over the long term in other areas. Costing families the ability to feed and raise cattle and make a living.” – Jerome Rosa, Oregon Cattlemen’s Association

“This whole conversation frankly is fascinating… One of the things that come to mind is this is a beautiful area… I say to you the reason that is, is the people that live there – the ranchers, the farmers, the local communities and the businesses… have made it what it is.”- Barry Bushue, President Oregon Farm Bureau

“You got another group that talks about wanting to sell tents and shoes and sporting goods. Awesome! I buy those things. But at what expense? Are we going to support their economy? Are we going to support their business model at the expense of ranchers like Elias who have 4 generations in to developing a livelihood for not only him, but a core of the economy and the state and that region. I’m sorry… I find it incredulous that people would put the value of their business selling products at the expense of the people who made the property what it is today. I’m floundering here to understand why people would not want to engage in a congressional discussion; would not want to engage on an opportunity to look at what this is, how it got there, and give the people that got it there the credit they so richly deserve.” – Barry Bushue, President Oregon Farm Bureau

I was honored to speak at the press conference following the committee hearing. You might ask why I would considering I’ve never been to the Owyhee Canyonlands? Because this affects ALL Oregonians. It’s not rural vs. urban Oregonians. It’s not Eastern Oregon and Willamette Valley Oregon. It’s Oregon, and I’m an Oregonian. And that’s why I joined the coalition – you should to. I’d like to share what I said at the press conference.

My family is deeply rooted in this state. We have been farming in the Willamette Valley since the 1950s. We grow grass seed, wheat and hazelnuts in the Mid-Willamette Valley. I have joined the Owyhee Basin Stewardship Coalition because I believe all Oregonians deserve a voice in our public lands, not just the special interests and outdoor companies with slick marketing campaigns. The true Oregonians have spoken. We don’t want and don’t need more government regulation in the Owyhee Canyonlands. More than 70 percent of Oregon voters oppose the monument without a vote of Congress. Most importantly, 90 percent of those who voted locally in Malheur County voted against the monument. To Gov. Brown and Senators Wyden and Merkley, please join us in opposing this monument without a vote of Congress. We need your support. I came here today to represent the voices of so many Malheur County residents who strongly oppose the monument but can’t make the 14-hour round trip to the Capitol to voice their opposition in person. I’d like to share the words of Adrian High School student Sundee Speelmon. As an FFA student, Sundee studied the Owyhee proposal with her classmates and shared her opposition in a letter to Governor Brown. She closed with this: “All I ask is that our opinion on this proposal is highly valued and taken note of. We want to be heard! Please ponder the matter with the residents of Malheur County opinions in mind.” I care deeply about this state, and as a mom and a farmer, I truly hope we listen to all people – not just adults, but those just learning to find their voices. Not just those from the west side of the state, not just Salem and Portland, but all of the state. I thank Sundee and her classmates for speaking up and let’s show her that Salem and Washington DC is listening.

Owyhee 3

All Oregonians should be proud of the Owyhee Canyonlands in Malheur County and thankful to the residents and ranchers that have made it that way. There is absolutely no reason for it to be designated a monument by President Obama. Go to www.OurLandOurVoice.com to join the coalition to tell Governor Brown we don’t need another layer of government in our state!

For more information, please see the below links:

Our Land, Our Voice – press conference

House Interim Committee on Rural Communities hearing

Seek Consensus on Owhyee – Register Guard

Oregonians want Secretary Jewell to oppose national monument in Owyhee Canyonlands

 

My response to the Portland Tribune article: “Business quiet on minimum wage rules.”

The Portland Tribune published an article yesterday:

Business quiet on minimum wage rules.

There was a Public Hearing on the rules proposal for the minimum wage law on April 25th at 2pm at the Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) in Portland. The opening line to this article: “The business community was nearly absent from a public hearing Monday on draft rules for how itinerant employees will be paid under Oregon’s new regional minimum wage law.”

Here’s another quote: “I was actually hoping there would be more business owners here so I could hear their concerns,” said Sen. Michael Dembrow, D-Portland, who was active in developing the new minimum wage law.

It’s a very simple reason as to why the “business community” didn’t show up: we were working. But, there’s another reason… we – the small business and farming community – collectively showed up at every available hearing for this minimum wage bill and many other bills that would affect us over the past few legislative sessions in Salem and we weren’t heard. We weren’t heard then, and there’s no reason to drive to Portland in the middle of a work day to not be heard now.

That sounds like I’ve given up, I assure you I haven’t. I will be writing comments and submitting them by the due date. I just honestly couldn’t believe that the ONE public hearing would be during the workday and in Portland… And then for the Portland Tribune to start off the article that way, well, frustrating doesn’t begin to explain it. In the possibility that Senator Dembrow takes to account what actual Oregonians think, you can write out your thoughts: Written comments are due to paloma.sparks@state.or.us by May 23 at 5:00 PM

For more information and the back ground of how the new minimum wage laws will affect small business and the rural communities, see these blogs:

Conversation About Minimum Wage Continues in Salem

Minimum Wage Hearing

No to Raising Oregon’s Minimum Wage

Why Raising Oregon’s Minimum Wage is a Bad Idea

Minimum Wage, Rural Oregon and Agriculture

The Portland Legislature

The Dream-makers

I am Oregon Business – a follow up to the Minimum Wage hearing

 

The Dream-makers

Flashback to last Thursday, February 11th and I’m on an airplane flying home from Washington DC. I had been there working with members of the US Congress to work through trade barriers for forage exports, as well as pushing to improve our west coast ports. But, while I’m waiting for the flight, and even while I’m walking onto the plane, I’m streaming live the minimum wage debate on the Senate Floor of the Oregon Legislature. I had to turn it off when the plane took off, and then received updates via wifi (thank goodness for modern technology!) on the flight from my friends that were watching back home. There were many who fought hard to explain why this bill should not be voted through. Ultimately, after a 6 hour debate, the minimum wage bill, SB1532-A, was voted through 16-12. On to the House now.

I’m now crying on a plane. I’m the window seat, and I have no where to go, and can’t stop crying. I know I’m tired from meetings in DC from sun up to sun down, and the daily fight to get the Oregon Legislature and beyond to understand business principles, and the importance of Oregon Agriculture and Oregon Small Business. But I’m just so damn sad. I’m sad for Oregon’s future. I’m sad for Oregon’s blind and mute “leaders”. I’m sad for all Oregonians. I’m sad for those poverty-stricken and the unemployed as I truly believe this will raise poverty and increase unemployment. I’m sad because the word “business” is looked upon with such disgust and it seems we are bad people – that we want to increase poverty for more profits. Are you kidding me? Look at me, my family and my life and what I represent – agriculture, small business, community service, family and faith. I want business to thrive – because then I can offer more jobs, higher wages, and increase the local economy. At what point did Oregonians stop believing this? I’m mostly sad at the huge disparity and lack of empathy for each side of the aisle.

So, here I am crying. And this is why… Representative Carl Wilson, District 3, on the House Floor yesterday sums it up perfectly on his floor speech. He reads:

An Ode to the Small Business Owner

There’s two types of business dreamers in this world: Entrepreneurs and Want-repreneurs. Anyone can come up with a great business idea, but it takes a special type of crazy to drop everything and will that idea into reality. As any entrepreneur will tell you, there’s a long and difficult journey between the moment inspiration strikes and the day the doors open. Even the smallest businesses take long hours, incredible sacrifice, and endless desire to make it happen. Here’s to the courageous ones, the crazy ones, the wild-eyed visionaries who never took no for an answer. Here’s to the self-starters, the bootstrappers, the credit card maxers who trade living for today for dreaming of tomorrow.  Here’s to the brave few who make the world run. Here’s to the Small Business Owner.

Representative Wilson finishes with:

“I trust that you will remember these dream-makers; these people who sacrifice everything to provide needed services for their communities. I still maintain and will always maintain that what we are apparently about to do in this chamber on minimum wage is going to be a death blow to the dreams of hundreds of these folks in the state of Oregon.”

For Salem Democrats, on the behest of Governor Kate Brown, to push an extremely dividing and possibly catastrophic decision in a few short weeks because of fear of special interests is in one word: irresponsible.

I have many ideas, and many complaints, and many reasons as to why this shouldn’t pass. To read more on the minimum debate from my perspective, read here. But I’m going to go with three big ones.

  1. It’s too fast. The fiscal impact and unintended consequences are unknown and there is no way to have properly vetted this.
  2. The wage is too high! It doesn’t account for unique needs of industries such as agriculture and food processing, among others. Again – not enough time to look into and research, and listen to those of us that know!
  3. Separating the state into three tiers based on county lines is not economically or geographically sound. Farms cross county lines, economies are significantly different in different areas of a county. For example, Linn County where I live has a larger urban area – Albany – but has much of the county in rural and timber land. Benton County has Corvallis, but also a large rural area. You could say the same for Lane County, Polk County, Marion County, Yamhill County, and others. ALSO another reason this has NOT been properly vetted and researched.

In the slim chance a legislator is reading this, I’m imploring you on behalf of small business, hard work, employment of youth, exports, transportation, rural Oregon, seniors living on a fixed income, agriculture, the strong dollar for toughness in exports, Oregon’s economy, poverty and unemployment: Vote NO on SB-1532-A. The future of OUR state depends on your sense of responsibility. I pledge I will fight beside you to give everyone a fighting chance to earn a raise, to land a job, to decrease unemployment and poverty, and to live a life they’ve earned – not one they’ve been given. I will do my part to work hard every day to keep our employees employed, and will continue to boost my local community. Don’t take that opportunity away from me. Please.

I am Oregon Business – a follow up to the Minimum Wage hearing

It’s amazing to me the disparity of opinions depending on which camp you identify with. Last night at the Oregon State Capitol, these two camps identified on whether you were “for” the minimum wage increasing or “against” the minimum wage increasing. Here’s the irony in the great divide: We all want the same thing. We all hate poverty. We all want living wages for all. We all want healthy individuals. We all want to have and be contributing members of society. The only difference between us is the ideas on how to accomplish that.

My friend Macey and I arrived at the capitol at 4:45pm and got into a line over 100 people long. This line was just for people to sign up to testify. Testimony was to start at 6pm. My greatest disappointment is the view people have for the other side. In actuality, most likely the opinion you’ve formed is wrong. And I’m talking to both sides.

Back story… One woman angrily began her testimony with this statement: “I want to point out the three men on the panel before me…”

I don’t recall the three men that sat before her, but I can imagine they looked a lot like my dad. He’s 57, white, and wears plaid a lot. Maybe a jacket or a wool vest. My guess is those three men looked like that.

Let me tell you about my dad. He’s a second generation grass seed farmer, growing up with three brothers and two sisters. They didn’t want for much, but they also didn’t have a lot. My dad worked for the family farm since he was a kid, missing weeks of high school to work on his dad’s custom spraying business for other farmers in the Willamette Valley. Realizing the family farm wouldn’t support all the brothers, him and his brother Gene started a trucking business with two trucks. They hauled potatoes, Christmas trees, watermelon, onions, lumber and anything else they could get paid for. He was gone on a “long-haul” more time than he was home. He’s mortgaged everything he owns to take risks on ideas, where some have panned out, others have failed. He farms today, along with that trucking business, and this year we are surviving. The money is coming in, but going right out in the form of equipment payments, fuel and labor. That’s okay because we get to contribute to the local community! That is what is so exciting about local, small business. We have good years and we have bad years – it’s farming. It’s life. To this day he feels guilty for missing part of my and my sister growing up years. My sister Ola and I? We’re proud of him – he did what he had to do, making sacrifices, for his family. That’s nothing to be ashamed of. Ever.

There was another sterotype mentioned multiple times from one camp: the single mom. I mentioned my friend Macey. Her story is too long to write here, but deserves to be heard. She lost her husband to cancer within a year of giving birth to their daughter and has been a single mom for now 10 years. She struggled with tens of thousands of dollars of medical debt she took it upon herself to slowly pay off over the years. She has struggled and still does. And she has had to make hard choices because it is extremely difficult to be a single mom these days – and let’s be honest at any time would it be hard to be a single mom or dad.

My advice: Don’t judge a book by its cover. Please don’t stereotype those human beings by the color of their skin, their gender, the age he/she is, whether they are single or not raising children, or the plaid he chooses to wear. Nor assume that if they fit this stereotype they automatically have to sit in one camp or the other.

Time for my FAVORITE part of the night. Two words. Malheur County. A great reporting by the Capital Press in this article: East Oregon ag interests lobby against wage hike plans. I met a woman named Sharla. Her family agri-business includes growing and a packaging facility for onions and asparagus, among other things. I was surprised to hear her farm and agri-business employs 150 people. Wow! They are located 400 yards from the Idaho border. Idaho’s minimum wage is $7.25. I asked her why she didn’t originally locate in Idaho. She said they thought about it but the community they lived in was more important. With a wage hike, though, they will be forced to re-locate and have already found a place to do so. What a travesty that would be. Their theme to the legislature was this: #CarveUsOut. I get it – can I jump on that bandwagon?

Counties

I wasn’t able to testify as the Chairs of the Committees stopped testimony at 9:00pm. Because Eastern Oregon had so many people there to testify, they were able to go first. I am glad they were all able to do so. I’m also disappointed I wasn’t able to speak about our farm and the affect an increase would have. But on the flip side, I was home in my warm bed within 30 minutes of leaving Salem. The Oregonians from the east side of the state didn’t get home until early this morning after riding in a bus all night long. Eastern Oregon: Your testimony was inspiring. Thank you.

Finally, this is directed at the Oregon Legislature. If a doctor tells me I have high blood pressure, I do. I might get a second opinion, but I’m going to believe the doctor. You know why? Because he’s a doctor, and went to medical school. I am not a doctor and I did not study the human body and medicine. If the business community is telling you we can’t do this, we can’t. You know why? Not because we want to be richer. We want to continue to employ our employees that have been with us loyally for decades. We want to continue to pay our taxes, support the local counties and state, and we want to continue promoting Oregon to the communities, states, and the world. If the agriculture community is telling you we can’t do this, we can’t. You know why? Because we farm, you don’t. We know the cost inputs, and the money we get paid for our crops. It’s not an opinion, it’s fact. And last night you heard it over, and over, and over again. Why don’t you believe us?

As for the few businesses owners that testified in support of the minimum wage hike, no one is stopping you! That’s great you give raises! We do too. An Adorable Old Guy testified last night: “If Portland wants to pay their employees more, go ahead and do so. No need to wait for this to pass.”

Twitter Min Wage

Brings me to my testimony. I’m posting my testimony here, along with Macey Wessels and Anna Scharf as we weren’t able to testify and we would like to share our story. Thank you for listening. Also – one last thing – I might wear cowboy boots and you might wear rubber boots, tennis shoes, flip-flops, or heels, but in general we all want the same thing. Oregon, let’s try to remember that.

Testimony on minimum wage_Shelly Boshart Davis

Testimony on minimum wage_Anna Scharf

Testimony on minimum wage_Macey Wessels

Macey Wessels_attachment_Holland facility

Macey Wessels_attachment_Tangent facility

Senator Gelser, the friend.

The political climate these days is simply awful. It seems people are on one side or another – there are no moderates. I’m exaggerating a little. But I was pretty involved in the 2015 Oregon legislative session, and there wasn’t a lot of compromise.

Compromise jpeg

Seems we don’t use this much, hence the definition. A little sarcasm.

I spent a lot of time at the state capitol this last legislative session with organizations fighting for and against many issues. I also spent time advocating for business with the Governmental Affairs Committee through the Albany Area Chamber of Commerce. Through this time, I worked often with both my representation from my district: Representative Andy Olson and Senator Sara Gelser.

Disclaimer: I did not vote for Sara Gelser, nor do I agree with a lot of her voting record. But I do respect her as a person and her ability to communicate and for many items that she has passionately and tirelessly worked for. In reading through the below, I think you’ll like what she has to say.

The Albany Chamber asked if we (Boshart Trucking) would sponsor the Women In Business luncheon today, September 9th, with guest speaker Senator Sara Gelser. We said we would. The women from our company and farm, as well as a few female farming friends all attended; along with about 90 other “women in business” from the Albany area. What we heard was refreshing, and made me appreciate the work our legislators do even more. I’d like to share a few quotes, thoughts, and ideas from her talk today.

September 9, 2015, Women In Business, Guest Speaker: Dist. 8 Senator Sara Gelser. “Show Up, Work Hard, and Laugh Often.”

TEAMWORK

“It’s always a team effort – no matter what you’re doing.” Here she is talking about her father’s businesses and the fact that his employee’s tended to follow him wherever he went. She also likened this to getting things done in the legislature. When she is part of sponsoring a bill, or helping write one, she talked about going to the person or group that will oppose it the most to get input. More often than not, it becomes a team effort.

COMPASSION

“I’m interested in the people the people don’t talk about.” Here’s where my respect grows immensely for Senator Gelser. She diligently fights for special needs, for mental health, for abused youth, and for those that can’t speak for themselves. I appreciate people like her… while I tend to immediately think on the business side of things and how in the world do you pay for these kind of social services, this reminds me that compassion is needed sometimes more than I think. In most situations, it takes all kinds – both me and her. And this shows that.

LEADERSHIP

“Leadership Lesson: Whether a business, a soccer game or an election – how you lose is more important than how you win.” Aw ya, she’s speaking my language. I’m a coach, and this is SO very important and isn’t taught as much as I wish it were. There are more lessons in losing than in winning. In Senator Gelser’s case, she was speaking on when she lost her first election and the discussion she had with her kids was how to lose, not just how to win. What a lesson!

“Leadership Lesson: In leadership as in life, you can’t be who you’re not. If you’re going to lead, you have to be interested and have a vision with what you are passionate about. Lead from a place of knowledge.” Yes, such powerful words.

COMMON GROUND

“We’re all people – we’re not going to agree on everything. It’s most important to show up. You might just find out where you’re wrong.” Many times did Senator Gelser and I not agree on issues being debated in the legislature over the course of the last many months. But she showed up to meetings to talk about and explain what was happening at the state capitol. I continued to email her information on everything from increased fuel costs of our business (LCFS), to information about the ports and how that was hurting our export market, to how some of the anti-business legislation would hurt our farm and small business. And she returned every phone call and email. To me, that’s impressive. “The best way to make an angry constituent even angrier is to not return a phone call or email,” says Gelser.

“You have to be willing to talk to those you don’t agree with. The more you can focus on building relationships, the more you can find COMMON GROUND.” In today’s world, this is so hard and we simply don’t see it – from Washington DC to Oregon and everywhere in between.

politics_climate_1

So back to my title: Senator Gelser, the friend. We don’t see eye-to-eye on most issues. But after showing up today to listen to what she had to say, I feel we might just agree on more than I thought previously. We are both huge advocates of working hard and I truly see that in what she does. And, I did laugh often during her chat with us today. So, thank you Senator Gelser and I look forward to working with you in the future.

LCFS, SB324, Low Carbon Fuel Standard – call it whatever you want, I call it BS.

The Oregonian just last week came out with an editorial slamming the decision making of almost all Democrat’s in the legislature for passing what the Oregonian Editorial Board is calling the 2016 legislature’s WORST bill: SB 324. AKA LCFS, AKA Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Read the editorial here.

Just for fun (sarcasm), I pulled up a little personal history of this bill, and in case you weren’t following along in February and March, and want to know how such a terrible decision was made, here you go…

Deep in the midst of the West Coast Port Crisis, this came up in February.

LCFS 1

A little stinky, don’t you think?

On February 24th, a Public Hearing was held in the House Energy and Environment Committee. There were so many people testifying in opposition to this, that they had an overflow Public Hearing on February 26th. I, along with many others, was at the Capitol until 7pm on the 24th waiting my turn, and since I was only 30 miles from the Capitol, I came back on the 26th in order to testify. You can read my testimony here. You can also read the testimony from many others – including Farm Bureau members, multiple Chambers of Commerce, family farmers, trucking companies, Oregon Transportation Association, the dairy industry, the construction industry and more. Concerned citizens came from near and far to try and talk sense into deaf ears.

Public Hearing at State Capitol on February 24, 2015

Public Hearing at State Capitol on February 24, 2015

So many concerned people tried their best to fight it! Friends, concerned citizens and legislators alike did their best to get the general public aware of this bad bill. Twitter, Facebook, articles, blogs… These are just a few I grabbed.

LCFS 5

LCFS 2

LCFS 3

LCFS 4

LCFS 6

After a 5 1/2 hour debate on the House floor on March 4th, the Republican party tried every single idea and speech and opinion out there to try and sway the Dems. It didn’t work and ultimately passed. What a colossal waste of time for all involved and for what? This will do absolutely nothing except support a faction of the “Green” industry that the left-side supports. If you are wondering where your legislator voted, here you go: The Senate vote was party lines EXCEPT Betsy Johnson seeing the light. The House vote was close: 31-29. It was a party line vote, except the following Democrats: Jeff Barker (D-Aloha), Deborah Boone (D-Cannon Beach), Caddy McKeown (D-Coos Bay), and Brad Witt (D-Clatskanie).

Unfortunately we ALL now suffer for 2 reasons: 1) We don’t have a transportation package because the Republicans refuse to move forward on one knowing what the LDFS did (and the Dems need at least 1 Republican… sidenote – it should make you think a lot if you can’t even get ONE Republican to agree with you…) and 2) our fuel prices are going to raise for absolutely no reason other than support for “clean fuels”. And according to this article, the “supporters of the state’s low-carbon fuel standard acknowledge Oregon might never meet its goal of reducing carbon emissions by 10 percent.” SMH. (And for those of you that aren’t teenage parents, that’s text-talk for Shaking My Head).

Summary: our fuel prices will go up for no reason.

Unfortunately, Governor Kate Brown signed the bill into law on March 12th, 2015.

So where are we now? Governor Kate Brown seemingly has “seen the light” and is in talks with leadership from both sides. Per the Oregonian Editorial Board: “Assuming the minority party is willing to wheel and deal, it should insist upon a couple of things: If Democrats want to subsidize low-carbon fuels, they should do so transparently and without using motor fuels as the vehicle. The low-carbon fuel standard is nothing more than a scheme for shifting money from those who buy gasoline and diesel fuel to those who produce low-carbon fuels. It’s politically useful, if somewhat dishonest, because it allows policymakers to pretend they’re not doing what they are, in effect, doing: levying a tax and using it to subsidize a favored industry. If policymakers want to pump public dollars into low-carbon fuels, they ought to do so explicitly – and prepare to explain to their constituents why the money is better spent on electric charging stations than, say, schools or state troopers.”

So, there’s a little “then and now.” It certainly makes you wonder what the future holds when it comes to this bad bill turned law. If it smelled bad when it started, then it’s a steaming pile of BS now.

Tick tock, tick tock… Harvest is around the corner!

Baler_Word Swag

Where did the time go? I don’t know if you realize this, but it’s May 14th. And to us in Oregon and in the grass seed industry, that means harvest is right around the corner. So how did I get to middle of May and not realize it? Hmmmmm… let’s see…..

The WC Port Crisis began in November, and many think it is over and have moved on. For those of us truckers and exporters, we are very aware it is not over. (See my previous blogs on the subject if interested). The contract will be ratified on May 22nd we believe, but the congestion at Ports of Tacoma and Seattle as well as the remote container yard at Northwest Container Services is very real. Daily we still struggle with repercussions from the long-term slowdown. The cost to trucking companies, farmers, and exporters have been huge. Our “new normal” is right around the corner, and I wonder what that will look like for us Oregon farmers, trucking companies, and exporters.

Trucks Seattle 3

Trucks waiting in extreme congestion at Port of Seattle

The Oregon legislative session has been a nightmare. The anti-business, anti-rural, anti-agriculture consistent themes have been one that demands the average farmer, businessperson and Oregonian to speak out like never before. Read a friend’s perspective on this here at www.oregongreenblog.com. I personally have been to the state capitol 3 times to testify against the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, diesel emission regulations, and minimum wage public hearings. Here is another friend’s perspective on the Minimum Wage bills here at www.nuttygrass.com. Many, many more bills that are important to us farmers and small businesses: legislated pesticide usage, mandatory PTO, mandatory flexible scheduling, BOLI “cease and desist” bills, and more. Countless letters, phone calls, and emails have been sent speaking out about these and making sure my local representation knows my thoughts on these matters. If you are reading this outside Oregon and are shocked that we’re dealing with all of this at one time, I agree – it’s almost unbelievable. Lastly, a local measure, Measure 2-89 in Benton County wants to ban all usage of GMO in the county. If this passes, a terrible precedent will be set for remaining counties.

NoOn2-89logo@2x

I coached a local club volleyball team through BOSS Volleyball. Yes, I coach volleyball. And love it! The courts are actually laid in one of our straw barns. As soon as we get the straw out of this particular barn, the club comes in and lays “sport court”. 6 different teams practiced 2x/week every week. Throw in 1-2 tournaments on the weekends every month, and well suffice to say I was quite busy. My daughter Kyndall was on my team, and it was a great opportunity to spend extra time with her and watch her and her friends grow as athletes. If you want my opinion on athletics and coaching – it’s a dying breed of coaches that feel we are teaching kids how to become better adults through sports. So many people have lost site of this – parents and coaches alike, and competition sometimes gets in the way. I saw this at every tournament. If you can ever find the time to volunteer as a local coach, I urge you to do so. It is one way to help our kids become contributing members of society, instilling teamwork, attitude and hard work into their core. Pretty soon, it becomes natural to use this hard work and positive attitude into every avenue of their life. A win for all!

At the BOSS Barn

At the BOSS Barn

Community Outreach – near and dear to my family’s heart. We’re part of Adopt A Farmer program through the AgriBusiness Council. We bring 180 6th-graders from Memorial Middle School in Albany, Oregon, to our farm. We had 5 stations to show them different aspects of our farm and businesses: 1) My brother, Farmer Amos, showed the kids about straw storage and even let them run the hay squeeze! 2) A local farmer, Farmer Ryan Glaser of Mid-Valley Farms, showed the kids our hazelnut orchards and taught them all about Oregon’s Hazelnuts. 3) My dad, Farmer Stan, showed the kids all of our equipment – from windrowers and combines to tractors, spray buggies and balers. But, I think Coach the Dog stole the show on this station! 4) Our Operations Manager, Farmer Eric, took the kids through the mechanic shop – starting with the truck scales where they weighed themselves as a group all at once, and finished talking about tires – some of them twice the height of the kids! – with the help of Terry, our local Les Schwab guy! 5) The final station was mine – and I showed the kids how we press the bales, containerize them and ship them overseas to customers. I explained the opportunities and challenges of working in an international marketplace, but they were more concerned about the money from around the world laid out on the table! In case you didn’t know, kids LOVE money. 🙂

Farmer Amos talking about straw bales

Farmer Amos talking about straw bales

Farmer Eric weighing kids on the truck scale

Farmer Eric weighing kids on the truck scale

Farmer Ryan talking about Oregon Hazelnuts

Farmer Ryan talking about Oregon Hazelnuts

In addition to Adopt A Farmer, we are involved with the local Albany Chamber of Commerce, bringing out their Youth Leadership and Trades Academy programs for tours on our farm. Lastly, we are involved with the Oregon Women for Agriculture and work on many projects including this great advertisement rolling down our highways and biways! Our Boshart Trucking trucks proudly haul this trailer all over Oregon – the response to it has been awesome! We love promoting “almost everything starts on a farm or ranch!”

OWA wrap_Word Swag

Then there was this little thing called Farm Mom. I laugh at that, because truly it was a huge deal! I found out on April 16th that I was the NW division winner of America’s Farmers Farm Mom of the Year! I flew to St. Louis April 22-24, at that time a national online vote was started. I found out last Thursday, May 7th, that I had the most votes and became the National Farm Mom of the Year. I know it’s a funny title, but I honestly couldn’t have picked a better one – Farm Mom, my favorite two titles for my life. I wrote a little about this in my last blog: The Most Important Crop I Grow… My Children. Along the way, I met 4 incredibly impressive women: Amy Kelsay, a dairy farmer from Indiana; Megan Seibel, a wine-grape grower and cattle farmer from Virginia; Shelley Heinrich, a cotton farmer from Texas; and Sara Ross, a corn farmer and member of Common Ground. Sara also blogs – you should check out here: Sara’s House – farm to table to you. Meeting these women in person, along with past Farm Mom’s through phone and email, I’m very grateful to be part of one incredible group.

Farm Mom_Word Swag

So, that’s where my last 6 months went! And now we’re gearing up for 2015 harvest – my favorite time of year! Gearing up for it takes a coordinated effort, and we’re in the thick of it now! Ready or not, here we go! Bring it on!

The most important crop I grow… my children.

Last Thursday, I received a call from Monsanto. A lady told me that I had been nominated and had won the NW Farm Mom of the Year. Wait, what? I hadn’t heard of this before other than an email from someone saying I would be a great candidate. How in the world did I win this? Well, the lady said, I had been nominated and apparently many had written letters on my behalf. I was asked to fly out on Wednesday – yesterday – to St. Louis to meet the 4 other division winners, to receive media training, a photoshoot, and interviews – both national and local.

Wow. I’m sitting on the plane  starting to write this now, headed towards one incredible opportunity, and have had little time to reflect on this. Humbled. Honored. Grateful. Excited. Thankful. Nervous! Farm Mom of the Year. I guess what makes me the most excited about this award are the first two words: FARM MOM. Anyone that knows me knows these are my passions.

Farming. I grew up on a grass seed farm. I started driving combine at 12 years old. This isn’t an abnormal story if you grow up in ag. Childhood was simply different for me from a lot of my friends, and I expect that my daughters will be telling the same story eventually. Summers = Harvest. A very simple fact. My family worked hard, and that’s simply all I knew. I’m realizing that our way of life is becoming more and more foreign to those living in the city. Our practices are strange, apparently questionable, and the urban/rural divide is getting larger and larger. What I see is an opportunity for a youngster to learn life skills while working a summer job on a farm and get some cash in the process – the urban dweller see’s it as “child labor.” What I see as respect and value of the farmer and the small business entrepreneur who took a risk, the urbanite see’s as someone who owes the employee a legislated, mandated higher wage, a mandated flexible schedule, and mandatory sick leave. What I see as responsible care-taking of the land through farming, the city-dweller see’s as questionable farming practices and dousing fields with chemicals. What I see as the trucking industry delivering goods to all of us – 75% of Oregon’s freight is delivered by truck – and being very thankful for the truck driver and transportation industry, city-folk see’s that truck only as a polluter. And finally what I see as Oregon being an Agricultural state proudly rooted with traditions of hard work, Portland and Eugene want to become California and adopt all of their rules and regulations.

What happened to the idea that here in America, anyone anywhere can do anything? What happened to work hard and you will succeed? You want my opinion? While our parents and grandparents and great-grandparents were working really hard, and keeping their heads down, raising a family, and expecting the lawmakers to be like-minded… well, in simple terms, they were wrong. And, we are now faced with a fight. A battle. The agricultural community is rising up, and I’m proud to be on the front lines.

Mommy-hood. Had to take a breath for this one. My heart swells with pride when talking about my 3 daughters: we lovingly call them Small, Medium and Large – a name penned by their dear Aunt Jen-Jen. My daughters will be contributing members of society. They will be givers, not takers. They will know how to “suck it up cupcake”. They will know how to work hard. These are my goals for their life. And each one is different – just like every crop is different. Our hazelnuts require a different plan than our grass seed. Some crops require constant care, while others require more time and attention during certain times of the year. But, each grow differently, look differently, bloom differently – and each are beautiful in their own right. And they each have their individual and riveting story that will be told in their own time.

Many know, some don’t, that not all of my daughters are biological. Not that it matters, it doesn’t to me, but it is a fact of my life as well as theirs. Just like learning about different crops, I’ve had to learn about what makes each one special. I learned about ADHD and learning disabilities, and a program called HELP that has changed her. I learned about asthma and allergies. I learned about encopresis and how stress affects young children’s bodies. I learned about mental health, coping skills, parenting a child that lost her biological mother. And, throughout all of this – this has made me a better MOM.

Davis family

Every family has a story… welcome to ours.

Farm. Mom. You literally couldn’t hand-pick a better title for me. I’m incredibly honored and humbled to accept this award, and learn what’s next in store for me. Like I said, I’m headed to St. Louis, and apparently more information to come about the “National Farm Mom of Year.” I’ll be learning more about it. If you want to follow this journey with me, I would be honored.

And if you’d like to vote for me, please do! Click here – one vote per day per email. Truly, I feel like I’ve already won, that just being recognized for my passion is thanks enough. But, any platform I’m given the opportunity to stand on and shout out to the masses how important Oregon’s agriculture is to us all, then I’ll take whatever someone wants to give me!

Note: Voting opens on Friday, April 24th and goes through Wednesday, May 6th. Your email is only  used as verification of 1 vote per day per email, and won’t be used in any marketing.